Holy Donut messed up, but LGBTQ community should focus on bigger issues

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As a gay man who grew up in an evangelical household and is quite familiar with the Salvation Army, I am willing to give Holy Donut the benefit of the doubt; and hope they instead seek input from the broader community in future gift drives. There are plenty of things to be outraged at in this age... like the court case in which Trump lawyers argued it was ok for a baker not to bake a cake for a gay couple; a recent decision by the Supreme Court not to decide on whether gay couples can receive spousal benefits; or the fact that we still have an unqualified and dangerous narcissist for a president.

But the "controversy" involving Holy Donut is another example of the immense power social media has and the great responsibility with which we should wield such a tool.

Frankly, I would expect some discomfort from the LGBTQ community regarding Holy Donut's coordination with Salvation Army to find needy families, but outrage?

Now, if Holy Donate had directly contributed to or substantially helped Salvation Army in some way, that would be a different story. Then we can demand some accountability and ask them to demand a refund from the organization.

However, Holy Donut had reached out to the organization and inquired about whether there were families in need. When Salvation Army came up with some prospects, Holy Donut then directly organized for the children in need.

So with all this outrage, we need to ask ourselves what exactly we're demanding from the owners of Holy Donut.

They can't demand a refund of a contribution to Salvation Army, because there is no contribution on record.

Should they close their doors and go away forever? That's plain dumb.

Should they demand those children in need who received the gifts to give them back? Now that is outrageous. No matter how you spin it, children in need were made a little happier this holiday season.

So what's left is that the Holy Donut commit itself to being more community conscious and find best practices.

That's about it, folks. Not sure what else you want them to do to satisfy the outrage.

But here's an idea for Holy Donut: Make a rainbow-colored donut and have a percentage of proceeds go to Portland Outright, to go toward helping homeless LGBTQ youth and people in need.